Author Archives: Edie Jarolim

Mystery Adoptions & Cryptic Crypts: Finding Cousin Erika

Mystery Adoptions & Cryptic Crypts: Finding Cousin Erika

I left February’s Family History Writing Challenge with several unsolved mysteries relating to my great uncle and aunt Adolph and Bertha Schweizer. The one that was the most puzzling, however, was the appearance on Adolph’s exit application of a daughter named Erika, born in 1925. Bertha would have been in her 50s in 1925, tooContinue Reading

London & Vienna: Freud’s World & A Family Reunion

London & Vienna: Freud’s World & A Family Reunion

There’s been a lot going on behind the scenes in the Freud’s Butcher universe, but it’s like the proverbial tree falling in the forest: If a blogger doesn’t post about events, did they really happen? They did, and they will–and here’s the proof. Psychology Today I’ve made many forays into discussions of Freud’s life —Continue Reading

Martha Solonche (1948-2018), May Her Memory Be a Blessing

Martha Solonche (1948-2018), May Her Memory Be a Blessing

This blog has become the occasional home for memorial pages of the recently departed who are not necessarily related to me, as well as the long departed who are. Its Jewish focus makes it particularly apt for the tributes to my friend Martha, who was a rabbi’s daughter and went to the Stern College forContinue Reading

Writing Challenge Wrapup: Black Sheep & Single Genealogists

Writing Challenge Wrapup: Black Sheep & Single Genealogists

As the 2018 Family History Writing Challenge comes to a close, I observe that I solved a few mysteries; came up with several more; and reaffirmed the importance of genealogists who pass along stories rather than genes.  A Divorcee and a Bastard (That’s A Technical Term) It seems that my great uncle and aunt, AdolfContinue Reading

What’s Freud Got to Do With It? An Earlier Look at My Family History

What’s Freud Got to Do With It? An Earlier Look at My Family History

In this home stretch of the family history writing challenge, I’ve been thinking about a time when I dipped my toes into the dark sea of my parents’ past–and then retreated. The Second Generation Revelation It was the late 1970s. I was working on a doctorate at NYU and seeing a therapist, Mildred,* for anxietyContinue Reading

My Father’s Story: Remembering Paul Jarolim

My Father’s Story: Remembering Paul Jarolim

It’s the 23rd day of the Family History Writing Challenge and I see no reason to leave my father out; after all, he’s 50% responsible for my genes and 100% responsible for my name. His sister, my aunt Edith Jarolim, was my namesake. More relevant to this challenge: He had almost literally the same historyContinue Reading

Commemorating Rita Rosenbaum

Commemorating Rita Rosenbaum

George Washington would have been 286 years old today. My mother would have been 105. The robbing of George (and, to be fair, Abe) of his own holiday in the face of the national commerce fest called President’s Day happened in 1971 but for the rest of her life, my mother was annoyed that herContinue Reading

The Sweet in the Bittersweet Schmerling Story

The Sweet in the Bittersweet Schmerling Story

This is Day 20 of the Family History Writing Challenge, wherein I continue the story of the Schmerlings, who returned to Vienna after the war. I realize I’ve spent more time with other members of my mother’s family than I’ve spent with Adolf and Bertha Schweizer, the ostensible subjects of this challenge, but a biggerContinue Reading

From Vienna to Tel Aviv and Back: Reparations Gone Awry

From Vienna to Tel Aviv and Back: Reparations Gone Awry

This is Day 19 of The Family History Writing Challenge. I’ll pick up where Day 18 left off, with Helene and Siegmund Kornmehl fleeing Vienna to Palestine. The context: I was describing the mystery of the late-life adoption of Erika by the subject of this challenge, Adolf and Bertha Schweizer, and went off on theContinue Reading

Adoption Musings, Part 2: What Happened to Helene Kornmehl?

Adoption Musings, Part 2: What Happened to Helene Kornmehl?

On Days 18 of the Family History Writing Challenge, I turn again to a topic that I’ve touched on before: Nazi record keeping. In “Emigration Questionnaire Raises More Questions,” I discussed the agency created to “accelerate the forced emigration of the Austrian Jews and (starting in October 1939) to organize and carry out their deportation.” But it wasn’tContinue Reading