My Own Private Vienna

Don’t look back. That could have been my family’s motto. My parents rarely talked about life in Vienna before the Nazis tore their world apart, and my sister and I rarely pressed them. Who cared about relatives we would never meet, the grandparents, aunts and uncles sent to concentration camps? Nor did our parents showContinue Reading

11 Responses to Genealogy

  1. […] Butcher, the PoemPosted on August 13, 2012 by Edie Jarolim As I mentioned in my introduction to the Genealogy section, I’ve trotted out the fact that I am the grand-niece of Sigmund Freud’s butcher for a […]

  2. […] Tradition, Tradition… Unearthing Deeper Jewish Roots, 1Posted on December 27, 2012 by Edie Jarolim Exactly one year ago, on December 27, 2011, I learned that the butcher shop of my great uncle Siegmund Kornmehl was now an art gallery in Vienna’s Freud Museum. This  discovery spurred me to look into the history of my mother’s family. Vienna State Opera […]

  3. […] 1. Wie kann ich mehr über meine Vorfahren herausfinden (Stammbaum, Familienforschung) […]

  4. Sandi Steuer says:

    I was very offended to be asked to leave the site.

    I am still searching for information about my father who’s mother was born Freida Kornmehl and married Michael Steuer. There was also his sister Anna kornmehl and his other sister Paula kormmehl. Paula died in an institution. Anna and her three children, died in Thereisenstadt as I found out recently. Her husband was named Hecht. We do not know anything about the destination of Hecht during the war years or if he also died in the same camp. My father Max Steuer, lived with his grandparents in Tarnow as the father disappeared and his mother died.

    • Edie Jarolim says:

      I’m not sure what you mean — this is my blog, and I am the moderator on it. If you are talking about the Tarnow portal, that is another thing entirely.

  5. Paul Layne says:

    Hi Edie, it appears we are cousins. I just met your other new cousin Elaine. I connect to Kornmehl on the Schmerling side of things. This is though Tauba/Doba Schmerling. She was my Great Grandmother’s sister. It would be interesting to connect.

    • Edie Jarolim says:

      Interesting indeed! The Schmerlings in Vienna were the closest to my mother of her many cousins; she didn’t talk about many Viennese relatives but she talked about Mimi and Ditte and Stella Schmerling — all first cousins. Where are you living?

    • Flora Selwyn says:

      Hi Paul, I’ve just been re-reading Edie’s blog. Doba Schmerling was my grandmother. Her son Heinrich was my father. His elder son David (my uncle) was the father of Edie’s (and my) cousins Mimi & Ditte and Stella. I now have the wonderful Tarnow Connection book and am overwhelmed with delight that so many of our Kornmehl family are alive and well when I had honestly thought none had survived. I quite envy my niece Elaine because she met so many of you. My Polish daughter-in-law found the house in Tarnow that belonged to the Kornmehl family. I was very emotional when she and my son took me to see it.

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